JINGO DISCWORLD PDF

Jingo. Cover art by Paul Kidby. Co-author(s). Illustrator(s). Publisher, Gollancz A weathercock has risen from the sea of Discworld. Suddenly. Jingo. In the 21st Discworld novel, Discworld goes to war, with armies of sardines , warriors, fishermen, squid and at least one very camp follower. Jingo is the 21st Discworld novel and the fourth in the City Watch theme. It’s written as a criticism of war, with particular reference to the Falklands .

Author: Yozshugore Grotilar
Country: Sweden
Language: English (Spanish)
Genre: Automotive
Published (Last): 8 February 2011
Pages: 481
PDF File Size: 10.58 Mb
ePub File Size: 7.17 Mb
ISBN: 253-3-90027-607-3
Downloads: 3377
Price: Free* [*Free Regsitration Required]
Uploader: Gardalkis

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Refresh and try again. Open Preview See a Problem? Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. Preview — Jingo by Terry Pratchett. Jingo Discworld 21 by Terry Pratchett. People’d live for ages side by side, nodding at one another amicably on their way to work, and diacworld some trivial thing would happen and someone would be having a garden fork removed from their ear.

Never more so if it is over a ‘strategic’ piece of old rock in the middle of ‘Neighbours Never more so if it is over a ‘strategic’ piece of old rock in the middle of nowhere. It is after all every citizen’s right to bear arms to defend what they consider to be their own. Even if it isn’t. And in such pressing circumstances, you really shouldn’t let small details like the absence of an army or indeed the money to finance one get in the way of a righteous fight with all the attendant benefits discdorld out-and-out nationalism Paperbackpages.

Published February 12th by Corgi Books first published November 11th To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about Discworpdplease sign up. Of all of Terry Pratchett’s books, the Night Watch series is my favorite, even though so far I’ve read only dlscworld Night Watch, Men dicsworld Arms, and Guards! To me, the humor in these novels is as therapeutic as Mozart.

Which San Vimes books. My husband has every single Terry Pratchett novel ever written. Discdorld I know which titles to grab off his shelves!

Lists with This Book.

Jingo (Discworld, book 21) by Terry Pratchett

If you’re into stuff like this, you can read the full review. Shocked and stressed, with the news playing in its continual loop in the background, I started reading jingk – having no idea what the book was about, only that I needed something to distract me. I ce If you’re into stuff like this, you can read the full review. I certainly didn’t distract as I immediately saw the paralells, instead it helped me get through that week a little more sanely, a big scoop of anger taken out of me.

I’ll always be thankful to Pratchett for that. Oct 29, Nathan rated it really liked it Shelves: You ask me which Pratchett story uingo is the best and I will yell to the world how awesome the witches of Lancre are. Granny is the other woman, the one I left my first love for. Before I fell in love with Granny, I was a city watch man through and through. Reading Jingo again has reminded me exactly why.

  ASTROFOTOGRAFIA MIGUEL CLARO PDF

It is not the dscworld book of the Discworld series, not by a long shot. Even against jimgo other city watch books it probably sits in, well, bottom half for sure.

So the fourth or fifth best book in jihgo second favorite subplot of a large series and I still flew through and gobbled up every damn word.

A small, tactically worthless island appears out of nowhere between Ankh-Morpork and Klatch. Of course both sides claim it and suddenly peaceful relations turn sour. A diplomatic mission from Klatch goes sour and soon enough war appears didcworld be the only result.

But it should be over quickly right, just as soon as those foreign dogs get a taste of cold steel they will run to the hills, right? Not the most subtle of book, but Pratchett is known to hide a single piccolo in a brass band. This time we are dealing with national politics, war, racism and immigration, and of course, national jingoism.

There is an early scene in this book that sums up everything I love about Pratchett, and it is only a few pages long. It is a conversation that could be held in any bar across the country and it is damn near perfect. All tied together at the end by the two sharing a minor victory as the man painting his ship finds the mistake they have been watching for.

At this point the City Watch as grown so large that only a few members get any actual development in the book, most just stick to their old roles or give a bit of comic relief. Sadly Angua may as well be invisible; this is a rare Pratchett outing that forgets to give the female characters anything to do at all. Nobbs learns a bit more about love, and Vimes learns once again that he is bought and sold. Perhaps it is because all the watch is present but few have much to do.

The relative lack of Angua especially is missed. And of course the whole Vimes is in a rut thing is starting to show. But I liked it better than I remembered. And who can forget rival street gangs putting their thumbs in their ears and chanting together a silly little nonsense.

And I have always wondered where you find lowerglyphics, what it means when seaweed is wet, and why someone would carry around a life sized inflatable donkey. I was also fairly impressed about the eventual conclusion to the early stories crime the war itself came later.

Everyone suspects everyone, even themselves, and both sides wanted to claim the criminal as their own is a different type of thing.

Jingo (novel) – Wikipedia

Not the best, but a solid entry. They ran out of weapons last century. Apparently it’s over a word in their holy book, sir. The Elharibians say it translates as “god” and the Smalies say it’s “man”. And some people reckon it’s only a bit of fly dirt in any case.

In any case, you have Lizzy Bennet and the adoration of the rest of the diiscworld to console you and yes, we can still be friends. But it is wishful thinking as well as longing for more Vetinaris and Sam Vimeses in the world. In “Jingo” Terry Pratchett is actually waging a bitter and deeply sad one-man war against nationalism, racism, religious fundamentalism, territorialism and all kinds of nasty-ISMS invented by men and he does it the way he knows best: And there is no better way to do it, in my book jino.

  CONCOURS EMIA CAMEROUN 2011 PDF

It was bleakly depressing to think that They were Us. If it was Them, then nothing was anyone’s fault. If it was us, what did that make Me? After all, I’m one viscworld Us. I’ve certainly never thought of myself as one of Them. No one ever thinks of themselves as one of Them. We’re always one of Us. It’s Them that do the bad things. I’ve been working on getting though the Discwo “It was so much easier to blame it on Them. I’ve been working on getting though the Discworld books since I was sixteen, which is now exactly half my life ago.

Fitting that I am also now halfway through Terry Pratchett’s most famous series of books, and just now really getting to the ones that start hitting harder. Judging from this book, a Kingo book will never be serious, but their silliness is more and more being undercut with a pathos that is riveting, an anger that drives the story.

Book:Jingo

That combo of laughter and rage is something I’ve not found anywhere else but a Pratchett book. And the more the series goes on, the bolder he gets.

The inciting incident ddiscworld Jingo is a long-lost island floating up from the middle of the Circle sea, right smack dab in the middle of Ankh-Morpork and Klatch, and both nations claim ownership of it.

This leads, of course, to war. Both nations start plotting and scheming. But this isn’t a war book like normal war books. And I’m being quite literal here.

But really all of this is just an excuse for Captain Sam Vimes to get involved. After all, if war is a crime, then who better to go after the criminals and stop it than a copper? And he brings the whole Watch with him. It’s not just war that Pratchett sends up here. He also takes jabs at racism, sexism, nationalism. I always have such a hard time writing about these books.

I don’t know why. Maybe it’s just because they’re so chock full of everything. Characters, one-liners, elaborately set up satirical gags. Or maybe I just personally have a hard time writing about humor. The only thing here is that I wasn’t super in the mood for this type of book when I picked it up.

I put it down several times to read other books, and had a hard time picking it back up but always really enjoyed myself while reading.